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Meet the Birds!

The Glen Helen Raptor Center would not be the same without our educational ambassadors.  These birds are not able to live in the wild due to physical or behavioral difficulties such as lack of flight or never learning how to hunt.  The birds are cared for at the center and help us fulfil our mission by giving people up-close opportunities to learn about and connect with the natural world.  It is our belief that connection leads to conservation, and our avian coworkers help build this connection.
Hover over the picture for a short biography of each bird.  Better yet, visit them in person!  
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CORVA

Corva was found as a nestling in 2022 in North Carolina. Unfortunately despite a lack of physical injuries, she became too accustomed to humans and would not reintegrate with wild crows. She was transferred to the Glen to be an educational ambassador.

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OWLBERT

Owlbert is a male grey-phase screech-owl that came to the rehab clinic in 2019 as a nestling with a broken wing.  Although he does have some small ability to fly, he is not releasable. 

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MAGNUS

Magnus, a male Barred owl, was transferred to the Glen after a fall from his nest left him with a broken leg. He is now part of the educational team and lives with Henry.

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TOM

Tom is a great horned owl who was found in 2012 as a nestling.  She is blind in one eye, and has reduced vision in the other eye, which prevents her from being a successful hunter in the wild.  

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MILO

Milo, a tiny male eastern screech owl, was hit by a car in late 2013, suffering head trauma and broken metacarpals (fingers). He can fly, but not well enough to hunt.

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COPPER

Copper, a red-phase female eastern screech owl, came in with head trauma and a wing fracture in 2015. She is unable to fly but gets around her enclosure well with special ramps.

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LOUIE

Louie is a male barn owl, hatched and raised in 2005 at the World Bird Sanctuary in St. Louis to be used for education programs. Louie is of a subspecies that would live in Europe and Asia, not in Ohio.

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ARCHIMEDES

Archimedes is a male great horned owl admitted in early 2020 as a nestling.  He had a broken wing and also has neurological damage that affects his balance and survivability in the wild.

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OLLIE

Ollie, an eastern screech owl, got his feet caught in netting, losing toes and talons.  This prevents him from hunting successfully in the wild.  He came in 2013.

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ARI

Ari, a male barred owl, was transferred from another center in 2001 for a permanent home. He was raised by people in 1998 and was too dependent on people for food to survive on his own. 

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DAISY DUCK

Daisy Duck came to the center in 2023 as a tiny fluffy baby.  Unfortunately she didn't have the proper nutrition and her bones do not allow for flight.  She is a fun, engaging ambassador owl!

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SAMMY

Sammy, a female sharp-shinned hawk, broke her wing in 2015 when she was less than a year old. This injury is probably the result of a collision.  She can fly short distances only.

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HELEN

Helen, a female red-tailed hawk, was found as a young bird in 2011. She was starving because of a wing fracture. She does not fly well, but is a key educational ambassador.

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BOBBIE

Bobbie is a female kestrel that suffered a broken wing in early 2020.  She is unable to fly well, but does foster young kestrels in the rehabilitation enclosures when needed.

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WARREN

Warren, a male turkey vulture, was found in Warren County in 1999.  Do to a car collision injury, he is missing the end of his wing.  He lives with Tag and Woof in a large enclosure.

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BULLET

Bullet is a young Cooper's hawk that came to the Raptor Center with a wing injury.  While the wing is significantly improved, the soft tissue controlling flight are still impacted.

WILL

Will, is a male red-tail, injured as a young bird in 2014 in Medina County. He had head trauma and a broken leg, and still has muscle weakness in one leg, and only partial  vision in one eye.

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ODIN

Odin is a male American kestrel falcon.  He came to the Raptor Center in 2020 with an eye infection that left him blind in the right eye.

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TAG

Tag, a female turkey vulture, was found in Warren County in 1998 with old wing fractures. She had been captured once before by a research team, and had orange markers (tags) on her wings identifying her for an on-going study.

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CEDAR

Cedar is a female broad-winged hawk originally from Cedarville Ohio.  She came in with a broken wing and although she can fly within her enclosure, it is not well enough to be released. 

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FLASH

Hatched in 2015, Flash failed to fly properly and was brought to the Raptor Center for rehabilitation.  She has improper feather growth that prevents her from sustaining flight.

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GRAHAM

Graham, a male bald eagle, was injured in Huron County in 2014. A broken wing did not heal well enough for him to fly. He hasn’t lost all the dark feathers on his head as a mature bird usually does.

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WOOF

Woof, the black vulture, moved here from a center in Cincinnati in 2002 with a wing injury. When disturbed, he makes a noise, which sounds as if he is saying “woof.”

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Did you know that throughout one year, our avian ambassador team eats a little over $24,000 worth of high quality food items?  Help support them by sponsoring one today or visit our wish list.  Every bit helps! 

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